Report Card: Marywood earns a C for 2013-1014 school year

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The Wood Word

This year, the staff at The Wood Word has covered lots of happenings and events around campus–some good, some not so good. As another academic year comes rapidly to a close, let’s take stock of the year to see just how Marywood fared in 2013-2014 in this, Marywood’s Final Report Card.

Nursing program loses, regains accreditation

In March 2013, Marywood University’s nursing program lost its accreditation, forcing 117 students to contemplate changing their major or transferring to another college. It was certainly a low point for Marywood.

However, by August 22, 2013, students received letters stating that the nursing program had been re-accredited following an appeal. With the appeal, nursing majors were able to breathe a sigh of relief and continue in their field of study.

Chartwells increases dining prices

As the fall 2013 semester began, Marywood’s food service provider, Chartwells, significantly raised the price of eating in the main dining room. What previously cost $9 significantly jumped to $15, upsetting students and visitors who regularly dined there. Chartwells continues to have a monopoly on food service on campus, leaving all members of the campus community hostage to the high and often increasing prices.

Performing Arts Center Thefts

Throughout the fall semester, there have been a number of thefts on campus. None however, were as costly as the three Mac computers stolen from the Performing Arts Center in September 2013. It took a number of thefts to occur before public safety was prompted to increase security in the building.

Cards swipes, new locks, and tighter computer security were added over winter break. However, even with these additions, thefts continued to occurr in the PAC, including instruments and their cases in February, 2014.

While some of the low points have had significant impacts on campus, there have been several other happenings that have served as high points for the University.

Marywood program attempts to assist veterans 

In the fall of 2013, Marywood implemented the Renewal-Veteran Education and Transition Services (R-VETS) program. The program offers eight-week programs in English, writing, and math for veterans who seek to continue their education. R-VETS is just one example of the ways that Marywood has been working to assist this under-served population. As R-VETS is being implemented throughout Marywood University, many have hopes that this will inspire other colleges to adopt the program and serve others throughout the nation.

Chinese exchange students bring culture to campus

In the start of the spring semester, Marywood began a brand new program. From Jan. 31 to Feb. 11, 31 Chinese exchange students were welcomed to the campus.During their visit, the students attended classes and experienced our culture, while showing the Marywood community their cultural traditions.

Learning Commons divides campus, shows promise

And then, of course, there’s the Learning Commons, which, depending on where you sit, can be considered a high or a low. Following the kickoff of the Bold Heart campaign and the ground breaking for the New Learning Commons on Oct. 18, a large fence was constructed around the Memorial Commons.

Since its establishment, a number of buildings and passageways have been blocked off, forcing the Marywood community to find new ways to navigate the campus.

Additionally, construction of the Learning Commons has caused multiple parking concerns for students. Commuters in particular have since been forced to park in reserved lots, where they are at risk of being ticketed by public safety.

However, though the construction of the Learning Commons has had many drawbacks, the new structure also will house a number of promising features and facilities once it is completed.

With group areas, cafes, study rooms, a book retrieval system, communication arts facilities, and the new Entrepreneurship Launch Pad, the Learning Commons boasts a number of features that will pay off once the structure is complete.

It seems there has been anpretty equal number of high and low points this year, so we’re giving Marywood a C.

What do you think? Did the highs outweigh the lows this year? Tell us by voting in our poll at www.thewoodword.org. And rest up this summer, because 2014-2015 is right around the corner and will, no doubt, have its shares of ups and downs.