Seniors receive hoods at Hooding and Honors Ceremony

Architecture+Professor+Kate+O%27Connor+places+a+hood+on+graduate+Elizabeth+Andrzejewski+at+the+Undergraduate+Hooding+and+Honors+Ceremony.
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Seniors receive hoods at Hooding and Honors Ceremony

Architecture Professor Kate O'Connor places a hood on graduate Elizabeth Andrzejewski at the Undergraduate Hooding and Honors Ceremony.

Architecture Professor Kate O'Connor places a hood on graduate Elizabeth Andrzejewski at the Undergraduate Hooding and Honors Ceremony.

Photo credit/ Katlynn Whitaker

Architecture Professor Kate O'Connor places a hood on graduate Elizabeth Andrzejewski at the Undergraduate Hooding and Honors Ceremony.

Photo credit/ Katlynn Whitaker

Photo credit/ Katlynn Whitaker

Architecture Professor Kate O'Connor places a hood on graduate Elizabeth Andrzejewski at the Undergraduate Hooding and Honors Ceremony.

Daniel Smith, Asst. Opinion Editor

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Marywood University class of 2016 received their hoods on May 13 in the Center for Athletics and Wellness.

Faculty members conferred the hoods to the graduating students in their departments during the Undergraduate Hooding and Honors Ceremony.

Collier Parker, M.F.A, Dean of the Insalaco College of Creative and Performing Arts, addressed the students and their families about the symbolism of the hoods.

“The hoods are a symbol of personal and academic achievement,” said Parker.

He explained how the hoods originated and became the foremost symbol of an intellectual.

Valedictorian Emily Schweiger, who is graduating with a B.S. in psychology, spoke about her time at Marywood during the ceremony.

“I am far more than the career I choose,” said Schweiger. “The person I am is shaped by my experience here at Marywood.”

Schweiger also encouraged the graduating seniors about their futures.

“Remember one thing,” said Schweiger. “No matter your religion, race or gender, we are all walking through this life together.”

Sister Anne Munley, IHM, Ph.D., president of the university, presented students with awards during the ceremony as Alan Levine, Ph.D, vice president of academic affairs, announced the names of the winners.
Three faculty members also received awards.

James Eckler, director of architecture studies, received the CASE Professor Award. CASE, the Council for Advancement and Support of Education, awards the honor to professors that impact the university and scholarly advancement.

Sophie Till, M.M., clinical assistant professor of viola/ violin, received the Distinction in Discipline award for her work on the Taubman approach to strings.

Lindsey Wotanis, Ph.D., associate professor and director of the broadcast journalism program, received the Distinguished Service award for her work with The Wood Word, Frame Your Future and recruitment for the communication arts department.

Commencement will take place at 1 p.m. on May 14 at Mohegan Sun Arena in Wilkes-Barre.